EMBRACING SADNESS IS NEVER A GOOD IDEA


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anarcho-queer:

Women Prisoners Sterilized To Cut Welfare Cost In California
In California, prison doctors have sterilized at least 148 women, mainly Mexicans, from 2006 to 2010. Why? They don’t want to have to provide welfare funding for any children they may have in the future and to eliminate ‘defectives’ from the gene pool.
The sterilization procedures cost California taxpayers $147,460 between 1997 and 2010. The doctors at the prison argue it is money well-spent.
Dr. James Heinrich, an OB-GYN at Valley State Prison for Women, said, “Over a 10-year period, that isn’t a huge amount of money compared to what you save in welfare paying for these unwanted children – as they procreated more.”
In 1909, California passed the country’s third sterilization law, authorizing reproductive surgeries of patients committed to state institutions for the “feebleminded” and “insane” that were deemed suffering from a “mental disease which may have been inherited and is likely to be transmitted to descendants.” Based on this eugenic logic, 20,000 patients in more than ten institutions were sterilized in California from 1909 to 1979. Worried about charges of “cruel and unusual punishment,” legislators attached significant provisions to sterilization in state prisons. Despite these restrictions, about 600 men received vasectomies at San Quentin in the 1930s when the superintendent flaunted the law.
Moreover, there was a discernible racial bias in the state’s sterilization and eugenics programs. Preliminary research on a subset of 15,000 sterilization orders in institutions (conducted by Stern and Natalie Lira) suggests that Spanish-surnamed patients, predominantly of Mexican origin, were sterilized at rates ranging from 20 to 30 percent from 1922 to 1952, far surpassing their proportion of the general population.
In her recent book, Miroslava Chávez-García shows, through exhaustively researched stories of youth of color who were institutionalized in state reformatories, and sometimes subsequently sterilized, how eugenic racism harmed California’s youngest generation in patterns all too reminiscent of detention and incarceration today.California was the most zealous sterilizer, carrying out one-third of the approximately 60,000 operations performed in the 32 states that passed eugenic sterilization laws from 1907 to 1937.
Although such procedures may seem harsh, they are not illegal. The Supreme Court ruled in 1927 that women can be forcibly sterilized in jail in Buck vs Bell. Writing for the majority, Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. said, “Three generations of imbeciles are enough.”
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anarcho-queer:

Women Prisoners Sterilized To Cut Welfare Cost In California

In California, prison doctors have sterilized at least 148 women, mainly Mexicans, from 2006 to 2010. Why? They don’t want to have to provide welfare funding for any children they may have in the future and to eliminate ‘defectives’ from the gene pool.

The sterilization procedures cost California taxpayers $147,460 between 1997 and 2010. The doctors at the prison argue it is money well-spent.

Dr. James Heinrich, an OB-GYN at Valley State Prison for Women, said, “Over a 10-year period, that isn’t a huge amount of money compared to what you save in welfare paying for these unwanted children – as they procreated more.

In 1909, California passed the country’s third sterilization law, authorizing reproductive surgeries of patients committed to state institutions for the “feebleminded” and “insane” that were deemed suffering from a “mental disease which may have been inherited and is likely to be transmitted to descendants.” Based on this eugenic logic, 20,000 patients in more than ten institutions were sterilized in California from 1909 to 1979. Worried about charges of “cruel and unusual punishment,” legislators attached significant provisions to sterilization in state prisons. Despite these restrictions, about 600 men received vasectomies at San Quentin in the 1930s when the superintendent flaunted the law.

Moreover, there was a discernible racial bias in the state’s sterilization and eugenics programs. Preliminary research on a subset of 15,000 sterilization orders in institutions (conducted by Stern and Natalie Lira) suggests that Spanish-surnamed patients, predominantly of Mexican origin, were sterilized at rates ranging from 20 to 30 percent from 1922 to 1952, far surpassing their proportion of the general population.

In her recent book, Miroslava Chávez-García shows, through exhaustively researched stories of youth of color who were institutionalized in state reformatories, and sometimes subsequently sterilized, how eugenic racism harmed California’s youngest generation in patterns all too reminiscent of detention and incarceration today.

California was the most zealous sterilizer, carrying out one-third of the approximately 60,000 operations performed in the 32 states that passed eugenic sterilization laws from 1907 to 1937.

Although such procedures may seem harsh, they are not illegal. The Supreme Court ruled in 1927 that women can be forcibly sterilized in jail in Buck vs Bell. Writing for the majority, Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. said, “Three generations of imbeciles are enough.

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Sweetness loves me

Sweetness loves me

bathroom hiding becomes picture taking because everything is a search for attention

endthymes:

this is so bizarre!!!! i just bought it

i hate being relatably miserable.

i have no phone service, and no money. i can’t text anyone or reach out to anyone anywhere but here, pretty much. i’m really really tired and really really ready to just stop trying to even function or care or express anything. i’m just so tired.

i am so depressed that the normal basic skills that would be there to think around this stuff are just, gone.

i feel helpless and i probably shouldn’t but i’m just really really out of energy and optimism and hope. i never felt like i was worth my own effort to begin with.

sometimes i would rather not exist

how can i spend time at a really awesome cool thing and still end my day feeling empty and like the world is a cold dark hopeless place

my mind is so broken.

saw CeCe McDonald speak and answer questions tonight and it was really amazing. i am really glad i went. i am still processing. there were a lot of really wonderful moments. it’s one of those things that remind me of years ago when i was too sad to move but made myself go to things anyway and was super glad i did. i’m still too sad to move, but i’m so glad i went.

jamiesinverguenza:

[Image set: four photos of cat shaped marshmallows. In 3 of the photos the marshmallows are floating in mugs. The other photo shows the box the marshmallows come in.]

bitchville:

Cute Marshmallow Cats Float by Japan-based marshmallow shop Yawahada

I don’t even like cats but attn YOUSAYTHEYDONTCARE

!!!! i would spend so much time being torn on whether to use these as intended or save them forever because they have faces

and i want them anyway

arpeggia:

Louise Bourgeois & Tracey Emin - Do Not Abandon Me, 2009-2010

Do Not Abandon Me is a collaboration between Louise Bourgeois and Tracey Emin consisting of sixteen intimate works made over the past two years. These drawings articulate physical drives and feelings, candidly confronting themes of identity, sexuality and the fear of loss and abandonment through joint expression.

This series originated with Bourgeois, who began the works by painting male and female torsos in profile on paper, mixing red, blue and black gouache pigments with water to create delicate and fluid silhouettes. Bourgeois then passed the images on to Emin, who later confessed: ‘I carried the images around the world with me from Australia to France, but I was too scared to touch them’. Emin overlaid Bourgeois’s forms with fantasy, drawing smaller figures that engaged with the torsos like Lilliputian lovers, enacting the body’s desires and anxieties. In one, a woman kisses an erect phallus; in another, a small fetus-like form protrudes from a swollen belly. In many, Emin’s handwriting inscribes the images with a narrative, putting into words the emotions expressed in Bourgeois’s vibrant gouaches.

This suite of prints was one of the last projects Louise Bourgeois completed before her death. They were then printed at Dye-namix studio in New York with archival dyes on cloth in an edition of 18 sets with 6 artist proofs. The exhibition travels to Hauser & Wirth from Carolina Nitsch Project Room, New York, and is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue.

it actually feels great to say it. that i’m irreparably flawed/broken. because before when i said it i felt guilty. but now you’re not going to read this.

i think a lot of times (not all, for sure, but a solid amount) you thought i was talking to you or directing stuff at you when a lot of it was just, the same performance of despair i’ve been doing whenever i get stressed or overwhelmed or miserable for years now.

this is what i do. i am miserable loudly on the internet. it has been my only method of coping that doesn’t directly damage others. or it didn’t used to, and that’s the thing. i had this, and it, the ability to vent here and get my thoughts out here has literally saved my life, multiple times. but then it stopped being a place where the thoughts could go without damaging anything. i think i really really needed a place like that.

I’ve tried keeping diaries and having personal blogs and it doesn’t work the same, i only exist when seen. something about knowing other people are reading forces me to look at my own thoughts objectively. it gets me out of my head, just a little, when nothing else does.

yes. my hyper-awareness of an audience has the invaluable side effect of making me look at my thoughts and feelings and self with a critical eye. which leads directly to sanity, with me. it does. it can. it has always, before.

i’m such an idiot for not seeing it sooner. i could’ve fixed it if i had seen outside of myself, and outside of how nostalgia-sad it made me to think of not being seen. because i already felt attention-starved, and just, ughhh. file under ‘things i will always feel soul-crushing regret over’

it’s truueeeeeee though

i am irreparably flawed

not just normal human flawed I know we’re ALL flawed

i don’t think i’m “special” (it totally sounds like i do though, i know, i hear it)

i just manage to do so much damage to my own life and the lives of others, repeatedly, when i don’t try to and i in fact know what i’m capable of and am desperate to avoid it and yet EVERY FUCKING TIME i ruin the things that are important to me

and i don’t see most other people destroying their own lives on a regular basis, you know? everyone has flaws and problems because the world is an imperfect place, but i am my biggest problem

my other problems aren’t very world ending, they’re just sucky things

i am the massive life-destroying hopelessness-creating problem

me!

despite the overwhelming sense that the essential flaw in themselves is so deep that it cannot be healed

despite the overwhelming sense that the essential flaw in themselves is so deep that it cannot be healed

i have a sneaking suspicion i won’t want to celebrate my birthday this year

i made this post weeks ago and saved it in my drafts and probably i’m just a self-fulfilling prophecy but, damn